Monday, January 31, 2011

Pumpkins!

This year I decided to grow pumpkins, I popped in 2 Musquee de Provence and 2 Jarrahdale seeds. I had no idea how invasive they are, they have literally taken over half of the garden, but saying that they have been fairly productive. The Jarrahdales have produced 4 large pumpkins in total with a couple more on the way and the Musquee de Provence sadly only produced one, but it is the biggest pumpkin I have ever seen, so I can't complain too much, we will be eating pumpkin soup all Winter.
When planting pumpkins I followed the general rule of planting good quality seeds in a heaped mound of well composted soil, I planted 2 seeds for every mound and once they were a decent size I would remove the weakest plant and leave the strongest to grow. A lot of gardeners "play bee" by taking a soft brush and hand pollinating flowers, I didn't have too many problems with pollination as we had an abundance of bees. The only problem I encountered was fruit yellowing and then dropping off the vine, this also seemed to happen with my zucchini's. I only watered them a few times a week and and a little extra on the days that were extremely hot, I have found pumpkins to be quite drought tolerant. Next year I will try Butternuts (they are considered a squash, but in Australia they are often referred to as pumpkins) and maybe something more exotic like Turks Turban. Happy Gardening!


7 comments:

  1. Wow. They look fantastic! I haven't tried pumpkins as I fear that they might take over our entire property (it's only just under 300 square metres). Buoyed by your success though, I may plant a few seeds in the preschool garden. I'm sure that your kids loved watching them grow.

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  2. The boys loved checking on them everyday, they were amazed at how fast they grow. Believe me they really have taken over the garden, they are giving the watermelons a run for their money.

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  3. It's amazing to out-perform watermelon. I remember one year that I planted a mini-watermelon, suited for smaller gardens. We came home from holidays and it had completely covered our front deck and one entire side of our garden. Hope that you are beating this heat!

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  4. What lovely looking pumpkins, Sarah. I grew a small orange pumpkin called Baby Bear a couple of years ago and was surprised how big the plant got, even confined in a grow bag. We've acquired a taste for butternut squash, so am toying with the idea of trying to grow one, but will need to work out where.

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  5. I am seriously considering digging up the pumpkins, but I have just noticed another 3 that are looking like winners so it they may have to stay put a little longer. Lanie the watermelons will eventually take over, they are a little slow on the uptake but I have noticed they are starting to invade any patch that is bare. Karin you have great taste, my favourite is the butternut, it is funny how Australians refer to them as a pumpkin, anyway they are just beautiful baked and tossed into a green salad with a drizzle of balsamic and goats cheese on top...my mouth is watering as I type away. The heat is starting to get to me if I have to endure more days of 40 degrees I think I will wilt, Lanie hope you are holding up too.

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  6. Sarah, I'll have to try that recipe. I've only had butternut squash in soup so far, and once in a vegetable stew, but never cold. The soup is so delicious, but I do need to try it other ways.

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  7. Lovely pumpkins! I grew them for the first time last year, not as fab as yours but I intend to give them another go this year.

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